Politics

Protecting the right to protest

Having been castigated for failing to uphold the right to peaceful protest at the G20 demonstrations, it seems the Met has learnt nothing, except that if you arrest people and take them to the police station there's a lot of paperwork and solicitors, whereas if you simply kettle people in a small area on a bridge you don't have to bother with any due process of law, provision of basic facilities, paperwork or bothersome solicitors and legal rights.

But then presumably the kettled protesters were particularly virulent and violent - the authors of this letter are

Rhodes professor of imperial history, Kings College London
Reader in international relations, University of Cambridge
Professor of history and public policy, University of Cambridge

How's that? Not violent protesters?  Surely the Met didn't make a mistake? Surely they ensured full compliance with the law

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/dec/14...

Letters: No explanation was offered for what amounted to mass internment, in very dangerous circumstances, of a crowd of demonstrators

 

Nick Clegg urged his party to take a leaf out of the Tory right's book

According to Nick Clegg's pledge: Conservative pact is for one term only | Politics | The Guardian

Nick Clegg . . . urged his party to take a leaf out of the Tory right's book by communicating unhappiness about illiberal policies.

New Statesman - Fisking Blair's chapter on Iraq

The most brilliant demolition job on Blair's version of reality with those pesky little facts....

Mehdi Hasan

 

Mehdi Hasan’s polemical take on politics, economics and foreign affairs

Tax - an art form

Things to make you ponder

CPS 'justice'

So, fail to protect a member of the public going good from work, beat a member of the public for on reason, fail to render him assistance that's all find with the CPS. But tip someone off about a search warrant

A policewoman has been charged after being accused of tipping off a person about a potential raid by officers.


Pc Grania Hale, 34, was suspended from her duties with Sussex Police after being charged with misconduct in public office.

Blotting a Moscow copybook

Blotting your copybook (from Fears Russian wildfires could drive radioactive Chernobyl waste ...)

Yury Luzhkov left for holidays and "treatment for a serious sports injury" as the city sweltered on 2 August and did not return until Sunday, several days after a toxic cloud had enveloped Moscow.

Extracts from Baroness Manningham-Buller DCB testimony to Iraq Chilcot inquiry

Couple of exchanges from  Baroness Manningham-Buller DCB (Deputy Director General, Security Service until 2002  Director General, Security Service, 2002 to 2007)'s testimony to the Chilcot enquiry

SIR LAWRENCE FREEDMAN: Were you given sight of some of the material produced by the Pentagon?
BARONESS MANNINGHAM-BULLER: I don't think I was. Probably a good thing; it would have made me cross.
SIR LAWRENCE FREEDMAN: Thank you.

on the Pentagon

Bin Henry VIII clauses, Ken Clarke told The lord chief justice used the lord mayor's annual dinner to give Ken Clarke a firm t

Law

Bin Henry VIII clauses, Ken Clarke told

  • guardian.co.uk,
    Thursday July 15 2010
  • Joshua Rozenberg
Although the Lord Mayor's annual dinner for the judiciary looks like a
scene from a Savoy opera, nobody should be distracted by the
anachronistic pikemen and musketeers, by the strikingly tall city
marshal in his red and gold uniform or by the swordbearer wearing his
fur shtreimel.
In reality this is the judiciary's works outing. However magnificent
the Mansion House banquet m

(...)arcane but highly significant power that ministers are taking increasingly often. "Henry VIII clauses should be confined to the dustbin of history," the (...)

 

What do 'others' think - and who are 'others'?

From The Guardian

The logic of joined up thinking.... or the foolhardiness of believe consultation

So, in the cost-cutting programme which saw 140 Post Office branches closed, Carharrack was deemed unviable as it wasn't busy enough.  But not to worry, the locals were told there would be a mobile 'replacement' service....

But this week (as reported in the Western Morning News Wednesday 10th January 2010), 'The Post Office has rejected calls for a mobile branch to call at Carharrack in Cornwall'... apparently telling Julia Goldsworthy that an outreach service would struggle to cope with demand and threaten the long-term viability of alternative branches...

 


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