Cameron: Government and I specifically promised was that there should be no closures or reorganisations unless they had support

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So the Judiciary have noticed that the current government doesn't follow the law and doesn't keep its promises

The High Court today found that “The TSA did not have vires [the power] to make his recommendations relating to LH [Lewisham Hospital]; The Secretary of State did not have vires to make his Decision relating to LH.” (Para 208)

‘Therefore the Decision of the Secretary of State insofar as it relates to LH must be quashed as must the recommendations of the TSA also insofar as they relate to LH.’ (Para 210)

In his judgment (Para 38) Mr Justice Silber also referred to a pledge made by the Prime Minister, David Cameron, in January 2013 to Dame Joan Ruddock, MP for Lewisham Deptford that, in relation to Lewisham Hospital in particular:

“What the Government and I specifically promised was that there should be no closures or reorganisations unless they had support from the GP commissioners, unless there was proper public and patient engagement and unless there was an evidence base. Let me be absolutely clear: unlike under the last Government when these closures and changes were imposed in a top-down way, if they do not meet those criteria, they will not happen.” via http://www.leighday.co.uk/News/2013/July-2013/High-Court-quashes-decision-by-Jeremy-Hunt-to-clos

Except seems the only way to make sure they did not happen was for the Lewisham campaigners to go to law - and now the Government want to appeal the decision and change the rules on Judicial Review

Grayling 'to seek new curbs on judicial review' | Solicitors Journal

www.solicitorsjournal.com/node/17142 - Cached

'Sufficient interest' test could be toughened in latest move. Chris Grayling, the justice secretary, is proposing yet more curbs on judicial reviews, 'The Times' ...

'Sufficient interest' test could be toughened in latest move

 

Chris Grayling, the justice secretary, is proposing yet more curbs on judicial reviews, 'The Times' reported this morning.

He announced a package of measures in April, including reduced time limits for bringing judicial reviews and greatly increased fees, which were implemented on the first day of this month.

The justice secretary defended further restrictions, part of the latest civil legal cuts, at the justice select committee earlier this month. The restrictions would include limiting public funding to successful applications.