History

Poem - Days of Kindness

Days of Kindness


(Stranger Music, 1993)

Poem - Ech day me comëth tydinges thre

 

Ech day me comëth tydinges thre,
For wel swithë sore ben he:
The on is that Ich shal hennë,
That other that Ich not whennë,
The thriddë is my mestë carë,
That Ich not whider Ich shal farë.

Poem - Somer is y-comen in

 

Sing cuckóu, nou! Sing cuckóu!

Sing cuckóu! Sing cuckóu nou!

Somer is y-comen in,

Loudë sing, cuckóu!

Growëth sed and blowëth med

And springth the wodë nou

Sing cuckóu!

Ewë bletëth after lamb,

Lowth after cálve cóu;

Bullok stertëth, bukkë vertëth,

Merye sing, cuckóu!

Cuckóu, cuckóu,

Wél singést thou, cuckóu,

Ne swik thou never nou!

Poem - Miri it is while sumer i-last With foulës song

 

Miri it is while sumer i-last

With foulës song;

Oc now neghëth windës blast

And weder strong.

Ei, ei, what this night is long,

And Ich with wel michel wrong

Sorwe and murne and fast.

Poem - Foulës in the frith, The fishës in the flod

 

Foulës in the frith,

The fishës in the flod,

And I mon waxë wod;

Much sorwe I walkë with

For beste of bon and blod.

Poem - Westron wynde, when wylt thow blow The smalle rayne downe can rayne?

Old poem - mediaeval or even older.

'Westron wynde, when wilt thou blow,
The small raine down can raine.
Cryst, if my love were in my armes
And I in my bedde again!'

 

Westron wynde, when wylt thow blow
The smalle rayne downe can rayne?
Cryst yf my love were in my armys
And I yn my bed agayne!

Quoted in The Lie of the Land

Found on film: the last survivor of the final slave ship from Africa to the US

Found on film: the last survivor of the final slave ship from Africa to the US https://www.independent.co.uk/news/long_reads/slave-redoshi-sally-smith-...

Her name was Redoshi. They took her from Africa, and probably forced her to become a child bride so she would fetch a higher price in the US as one half of a “breeding couple”.

The overseers beat her if she failed to understand English. She passed on the language of her African homeland to her children and grandchildren anyway.

Even as an old woman, she kept the memory of home alive, decorating her Alabama yard as they did in west Africa, keeping the old spiritual beliefs beneath her Christianity.

Renewing the Water Bounds at Truro....

RENEWAL OF THE WATER BOUNDS OF THE PORT OF TRURO

On Friday last, the water bounds of the port were renewed by the Town Council, according to ancient custom. The officers of her Majesty's Customs and other persons officially connected with the port, and some personal friends of the Town Council, were invited to take part in the proceedings. The party left the quay at nine o'clock, on board the "SYDNEY" steamer, and proceeded down the river to Messick Point, where the ancient practice of formally arresting one of her Majesty's lieges for the sum of GBP 999.19s.11 1/4 d. was gone through and the necessary bail for his appearance at the Court of Record was accepted. The other usual forms were also observed, and the boundary marks were renewed on a rock near the point.

The steamer then proceeded to the Mylor or opposite bank of the river, where the arresting was again proceeded with, and the necessary bail put in for an appearance. The boundary marks T.B. were also made at this spot, when the party returned to the steamer, and had a pleasant cruise through the harbour, and beyond the Black Rock. After this, they returned to

Word of the day: "clinkerbell" - icicle (Somerset; archaic). Other regional names for icicles include "aquabob" (Kent), "ickle"

Word of the day: "clinkerbell" - icicle (Somerset; archaic).
Other regional names for icicles include "aquabob" (Kent), "ickle"
(Yorkshire), "tankle" (Durham), "shuckle" (Cumbria) & "conkerbill"
(Newfoundland).


Cornish dialect: Conkerbell, Cockabell or Cockerbell………….. An icicle
according to The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary By Frederick W. P. Jago

Cornish language: 

English Words

kleghi

kleghi

n.coll

Word of the day: “Eisvogel” - German for kingfisher, literally “ice-bird”; in Russian Зимородок, lit. “winter-born”

Word of the day: “Eisvogel” - German for kingfisher, literally
“ice-bird”; in Russian Зимородок, lit. “winter-born”. Names possibly
given because kingfishers appear in new territories when their
established fishing grounds freeze in winter.

 


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